• Focus. Artist

    Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri

    •       Acclaimed Australian Aboriginal Artist Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri was one of the small party of Pintupi whose arrival in Kiwirrkura in 1984 made national headlines. Until this point Warlimpirrnga had never encountered European society as he and his family lived a traditional and nomadic life. This intimate knowledge of the land, its flora and fauna and waterholes allowed them to survive, as their ancestors had for thousands of years and It is this sacred landscape with its significant sites that Warlimpirrnga so strikingly describes in his paintings. His meticulously applied designs and methodical background dotting resulted in works that exhibited a distinct rhythmic quality. Warlimpirrnga paints Snake and Tingari stories for his country, including the sites of Marawa and Kanapilya and the salt lake and soakage area of Kalparti. Other recurrent subjects are Minatapinya, a large swamp south of Marawa, where Tingari men camped as they made their way east towards Wilkinkarra, as well as Malu (Kangaroo) Dreaming. Since the completion of his first painting in 1987, Warlimpirrnga has appeared in many exhibitions. In 2000 Warlimpirrnga travelled to Sydney with a group of four men from Kiwirrkurra to make a ground painting at the Art Gallery of New South Wales for the opening of 'Papunya Tula: Genesis and Genius'. In 2012, Warlimpirrnga was amongst a small group of Australian artists to have work included in DOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel, Germany. In 2015, Warlimpirrnga had his first solo exhibition in the United States, when 'Maparntjarra' opened at Salon 94 In New York City.

            Acclaimed Australian Aboriginal Artist Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri was one of the small party of Pintupi whose arrival in Kiwirrkura in 1984 made national headlines. Until this point Warlimpirrnga had never encountered European society as he and his family lived a traditional and nomadic life. This intimate knowledge of the land, its flora and fauna and waterholes allowed them to survive, as their ancestors had for thousands of years and It is this sacred landscape with its significant sites that Warlimpirrnga so strikingly describes in his paintings.

Editorial | Workwear

Installation view of “Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri: Maparntjarra” at Salon 94, New York. Via artsy.net



    • His meticulously applied designs and methodical background dotting resulted in works that exhibited a distinct rhythmic quality. Warlimpirrnga paints Snake and Tingari stories for his country, including the sites of Marawa and Kanapilya and the salt lake and soakage area of Kalparti. Other recurrent subjects are Minatapinya, a large swamp south of Marawa, where Tingari men camped as they made their way east towards Wilkinkarra, as well as Malu (Kangaroo) Dreaming. Since the completion of his first painting in 1987, Warlimpirrnga has appeared in many exhibitions. In 2000 Warlimpirrnga travelled to Sydney with a group of four men from Kiwirrkurra to make a ground painting at the Art Gallery of New South Wales for the opening of 'Papunya Tula: Genesis and Genius'. In 2012, Warlimpirrnga was amongst a small group of Australian artists to have work included in DOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel, Germany. In 2015, Warlimpirrnga had his first solo exhibition in the United States, when 'Maparntjarra' opened at Salon 94 In New York City.

Editorial | Workwear  Editorial | Workwear Editorial | Workwear  Editorial | Workwear

Left: Untitled, 2015 - via Artsy.net // Right: Untitled, 2011 synthetic polymer paint on linen canvas - via Art Gallery NSW




Editorial | Workwear Editorial | Workwear Editorial | Workwear Editorial | Workwear

Left: Untitled, 2011, acrylic on linen
 - via Utopia Art Sydney
Right: Group Exhibition, Desert Painters of Australia Part II, Gagosian, Beverly Hills (26 July–6 September 2019) - via ocula.com




Editorial | Workwear Editorial | Workwear Editorial | Workwear Editorial | Workwear

Left: Group Exhibition, Desert Painters of Australia Part II, Gagosian, Beverly Hills (26 July–6 September 2019) - via ocula.com // Right: Untitled - via Gannon House Gallery



Editorial | Workwear

Installation view of “Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri: Maparntjarra” at Salon 94, New York. Via artsy.net